Publications & Tools

We have organised our growing library of publications and tools to better serve the sex worker-led movement, funders, and allies. We have highlighted key topics that intersect with our work including participatory grantmaking, donor finders, and other work contributed from regional networks, sex worker funders, and other organisations that support sex worker rights.

In preparation for our second strategic plan, we reflected on our work to date: what have we accomplished, what have we learned, and how can we use these lessons to plan for the future. To understand the impact of our work, we gathered feedback from grantees, other activists, funders, members of the International Steering Committee (ISC) and Programme Advisory Committee (PAC) and staff.

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This communications toolkit was commissioned by the Levi Strauss Foundation and written by Leon Mar. It is a resource primarily intended for internal use by individuals and organisations seeking support for sex work-related programs from prospective donors and philanthropic institutions. The messaging contained herein (but not the toolkit itself) is aimed at prospective donors who are either under-informed or misinformed with regard to sex work issues but whose financial support is potentially desirable to advance the human rights of sex workers.

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This page intends to provide a guide to the potential resources accessible for sex-workers during the crisis of the COVID-19. It includes potential financial support, best-practice resources and right-based tools.

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The meeting Donor Dialogue: Donor Collaboration to Advance the Human Rights of Sex Workers brought together sex worker activists and donors with backgrounds in human rights, women’s rights, global health and social justice to strategize on the establishment of a formal donor collaboration mechanism to advance the rights of sex workers. A background report was commissioned to examine the current context of sex work and human rights, the range of organizations currently working to advance sex worker rights, and the expectations of the involved donors for the proposed collaboration. Co-organized by Mama Cash and the Open Society Institute’s Sexual Health and Rights Project (SHARP), in collaboration with AIDS Fonds, American Jewish World Service, Global Fund for Women, HIVOS, and the Oak Foundation.

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“In 2014, the Red Umbrella Fund partnered with Mama Cash and the Open Society Foundations to commission a mapping of global grantmaking for sex worker rights by public and private foundations and other non-governmental organisations (NGOs). The researchers contacted foundations and organisations working with sex workers to better understand what is being funded and to identify the main gaps.”

Funding needed to end violence against sex workers

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The Donor-Activist Dialogue on Sex Work and Trafficking brought donors, anti-human trafficking advocates, sex workers’ rights activists, researchers, and academics from different countries together to:
– Understand some of the language and terms generally used to describe sex work, migration and trafficking, and how these concepts are inter-related but distinct.
– Identify the real-life consequences to sex workers and persons trafficked into the sex sector and their families of policies and programs that are premised on the notion that all sex work results from trafficking.
– Examine how to leverage existing models that approach sex work from a rights-based perspective to stop trafficking into the sex sector.
– Recommend how to support and implement anti-trafficking efforts that affirm the rights of sex workers and others affected by anti-trafficking legislation.
This report summarizes the presentations, discussions, and recommendations made at a two-day dialogue organized by CREA, NSWP and OSI held on 11-12 December, 2008 at Tarrytown, New York.

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A 2010 mapping of Sex Worker Organizations’ and Projects’ Funding Priorities commissioned by the Donor Dialogue to Advance Sex Workers’ Rights: Mama Cash, Open Society Institute’s Sexual Health and Rights Project (SHARP), in collaboration with AIDS Fonds, American Jewish World Service, Global Fund for Women, HIVOS, and the Oak Foundation.

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“Sex workers across the world are organising against criminalisation, which puts not just their livelihood at risk but their entire lives?and those of their loved ones. They are generally recognised as marginalised and highly vulnerable in today’s societies, embodying multiple layers of stigma because of the work they do, and also because they are often poor, lack formal education, belong to Indigenous or migrant populations, identify as trans or gay, or are single mothers. However, funding to support sex worker organisations and their community mobilisation efforts is scarce… Sex worker organisations call on funders to provide more funding that is long term and covers rent, salaries, trainings, legal services, and advocacy. They also want funders to speak up in support of sex workers? rights.” Written by former Coordinator Nadia van der Linde Time to Turn Up the Volume [Cited as N van der Linde, “Time to Turn Up the Volume”, Anti-Trafficking Review, Anti-Trafficking Review, issue 12, 2019, pp. 194-199, www.antitraffickingreview.org.] View