Publications & Tools

We have organised our growing library of publications and tools to better serve the sex worker-led movement, funders, and allies. We have highlighted key topics that intersect with our work including participatory grantmaking, donor finders, and other work contributed from regional networks, sex worker funders, and other organisations that support sex worker rights.

The 2019-2020 Global Resources Report: Government & Philanthropic Support for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex Communities is?the most comprehensive report to date on the state of global funding for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) issues. This report documents data on over 15,800 grants awarded by 499 foundations, intermediary NGOs, and corporations and by 17 donor government and multilateral agencies over the two-year period of 2019?2020. This new edition documents a total of $576 million, showing that global LGBTI funding grew by 3%, or over $16 million (USD). Notably, this edition of the report also documents a 38% increase in the number of grantees.
LGBTI funding for LGBTI sex workers remains at less than 1% of overall lGBTI funding globally.

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In preparation for our second strategic plan, we reflected on our work to date: what have we accomplished, what have we learned, and how can we use these lessons to plan for the future. To understand the impact of our work, we gathered feedback from grantees, other activists, funders, members of the International Steering Committee (ISC) and Programme Advisory Committee (PAC) and staff.

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This document has been developed for sex workers’ rights activists as a template on how to approach some of the most commonly asked questions by media representatives. It can be intimidating for activists with no experience to work with journalists and you might not feel confident enough to engage with them. But sex workers have the real-life knowledge from their experiences, and this makes them an expert on sex work. Still, it is important that sex workers feel able to communicate their thoughts and arguments in a way that is useful and safe for themselves, for their community and sex workers’ rights. We hope that this guide will give some directions so that sex workers can become more confident. This document is not meant to tell sex workers what they should think or say but merely to make them aware of the common topic of interests shown by media when talking about sex work and of the rhetoric commonly used by sex workers? rights movement to tackle these questions.

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From the Funding for Real Change collaboration with Edge, this toolkit focuses on supporting funders that want to learn more about providing multi-year core, flexible funding. “To help funders and nonprofits harness this positive momentum for change, we offer this tool kit of tactics, resources, examples, and starting points. We seek to equip trustees, CEOs, program officers, and grantees themselves to overcome board biases and other barriers, to accelerate the shift to multiyear, flexible funding, and to embrace practices that create the greatest impact and strongest partnerships with their grantees.”

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Part of Human Rights Funders Network and Candid’s Advancing Human Rights research, this interactive site shows top funders and provides an overview of grantmaking by region, issue, population, and strategy.

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A resource by Srilatha Batliwala (CREA) and shared by NAMATI – a practitioner’s primer to “understanding power in terms of both power structures and power relations.”
“The purpose of this primer is to sort out the confusion and help us move to a shared understanding of power, so that all of us who are committed to social and gender justice can build our strategies from a more comprehensive, shared definition and analysis of power as it operates in society, regardless of our specific issues or socio-economic, political, and cultural contexts.” Also available in Bengali, Nepali, and Hindi.

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The data presented in this fact sheet is for the period December 2020 – November 2021 and has been captured among sex workers in Botswana, Mozambique, South Africa and Zimbabwe as part of the Hands Off programme. Peer educators, rights defenders, outreach workers, paralegals and sex worker focal points are often one of the first contacted by sex workers after they have experienced violence. These first responders document the cases of human rights violations using confidential and secured tools.

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“The Anti-Trafficking Review promotes a human rights-based approach to anti-trafficking. It explores trafficking in its broader context including gender analyses and intersections with labour and migration. It offers an outlet and space for dialogue between academics, practitioners, trafficked persons and advocates seeking to communicate new ideas and findings to those working for and with trafficked persons.
The journal presents rigorously considered, peer-reviewed material in clear English. Each issue relates to an emerging or overlooked theme in the field of anti-trafficking.”
This issue includes 14 articles drafted by leaders from sex worker-led organisations, Nadia van der Linde (Red Umbrella Fund) and others on the topic of sex worker organising.

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In this piece, Red Schulte and contributors from the Support Ho(s)e collective share their personal experiences with the best and worst funders. There are so few funders in the space that when mistakes are made there is a lack of accountability for funders that leads to compounding violence for organizers.

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This joint briefing paper by NSWP and INPUD highlights the specific needs and rights of sex workers who use drugs, as a community that spans two key populations. This document provides an overview of some of the most endemic and substantive ways in which sex workers who use drugs face double criminalisation and associated police harassment, intersectional stigma, compounded marginalisation and social exclusion, heightened interference and harassment from healthcare and other service providers, infantilisation, pathologisation, and an associated undermining of agency, choice, and self-determination. A Community Guide is also available.

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This joint briefing paper by NSWP and INPUD highlights the specific needs and rights of sex workers who use drugs, as a community that spans two key populations. This document provides an overview of some of the most endemic and substantive ways in which sex workers who use drugs face double criminalisation and associated police harassment, intersectional stigma, compounded marginalisation and social exclusion, heightened interference and harassment from healthcare and other service providers, infantilisation, pathologisation, and an associated undermining of agency, choice, and self-determination. A Community Guide is also available.

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Globally sex workers experience a number of barriers to comprehensive
sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services, ranging from explicit
exclusion from international financing to discrimination within SRH
services leading to lower access rates.

This paper discusses the obstacles sex workers face when accessing
SRH services, and examines the quality of services available to them. It
also provides practical examples and recommendations for improving the
accessibility and acceptability of SRH services for sex workers.

A Community Guide is also available.

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This Briefing Paper documents the stigma and discrimination experienced by LGBT sex workers and highlights differences in their experiences when compared with other members of their respective communities. It also includes recommendations for addressing the double stigma and discrimination experienced by those at the intersection of the sex work and LGBT communities.

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